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Virtual exhibitions

tuskulenai title EN

THE LAST OWNERS OF TUSKULĖNAI MANOR – THE RIGHTEOUS AMONG THE NATIONS

Lives and fates of the Lithuanians, Poles, Jews and other nations have intertwined in Vilnius since olden times. In the middle of the 20th century, after Nazi Germany occupied Lithuania, persecutions of Jews started. Different kinds of punishment were imposed on the people who saved Jews. If a person who hid a Jew and was reported to the representatives of the authority explained that he/she did it for money, he/she was sentenced to three months imprisonment. Those savers who being Catholics showed compassion to the life being destroyed, were attributed to partisans and their families were shot dead together with their small children, and their farms were set on fire or were handed over to the informant.

This exhibition is dedicated to the people who saved Jews risking their lives during the years of the Nazi occupation (1941–1944). The historians established that more than 25000 Lithuanian residents helped their fellow citizens Jews to save themselves from the Holocaust. It is thought that during the years of the Nazi occupation about 2500–4000 were hidden in Lithuania. Until 2012, the Institute of National Remembrance (Yad Vashem) gave 831 Lithuanian citizens the Righteous among the Nations award. The Polish family of Vincent and Jadvyga Antonovič who lived in Vilnius also received the Righteous among the Nations award.

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tuskulenai ico EN

TUSKULĖNAI IN ICONOGRAPHIC MATERIAL

The territory in which the Memorial Complex of the Tuskulėnai Peace Park is established, since the 16th century has been known as the land of the royal court called Derevnictva and functioned as an auxiliary farm of Vilnius castles with a large farmstead, orchards and ponds. The founder of the manor was Grand Duke of Lithuania and King of Poland Žygimantas Augustas. The family of the sovereign more than once stayed in the manor situated out of town. In the middle of the 17th century, the manor lost the royal status. It was run by the noblemen Valavičiai, Pacai (Polish: Pacowie), the counts Tyzenhauz family. The territory was surrounded by large hunting areas, the pilgrimage route to the Vilnius Calvary passed through it. In the second half of the 18th century, the holding of the manor was divided into separate and independent farms. A part of the manor homestead that was given to the Canons Regular of the Lateran was started to be called Tuskulėnai, and the other part of the former manor was referred to as Derevnictva poliwark...

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